THE UPCOMING.

The Impermanent Collection Exhibition

From the 8th of September until the 6th of October the Occupy My Time Gallery in Deptford will be the hosts of the Impermanent Collection, a series of works created by Maslen and Mehra.

 

Describing their practice as “diverse, imaginative and experimental graphic language” the pair collaborate to create comparisons and contemplations which relate to the world in which we live and our human interactions within it. Maslen and Mehra use their sculptural works to merge the old and the natural with the new and falsified man-made world. They deeply examine how we have the ability to change our landscape and in effect destroy it. The museum objects that serve as inspiration for the pieces in the show, remain only in reference as the works are captioned with a blurry photograph of the original artefacts blurb in its original setting. The pieces themselves are deconstructions of their originals, morphed by the changing opinions of time and thus leaving a haunting reality of our surrounding world.

The artist duo formulated the works on show based upon an extensive research process spanning three years. Commenting directly on the power of the history, document and museum cultures, they have collaborated and constructed works based on the collections of museums such as the V&A, The Archaeological Museum and the Asian Museum of Civilisation. With such a rich pool of sources of inspiration it is no surprise that the work they exhibit in the Impermanent Collection Exhibition follows suit. Featuring works across a multitude of disciplines, it is easy to see that the duo favour the relevance and strength of medium in creating a message rather than limiting themselves to a narrowed field of craft. Using materials familiar to the ages that they reference, the works create a dynamic connection between past, present and future allowing us to consider the consequences of our actions in the same way. Their in-depth research process, experimental techniques and thought-provoking themes all conjoin to create an eye-opening show which captures your interest from the moment you enter, until you can drag yourself away.

For me, the most spectacular moments of thought were created by a collection of plates. A nostalgic medium usually created in ceramics, but in this case recreated in paper-mache in the hands of Maslen and Mehra, they are transformed into a sinister community-reflective tool addressing the political, cultural and moral decisions we make and how they may be addressed as historical artefacts or moments in time. Almost mocking the way in which we now live compared to our past, they highlight our obsession with money, power and possessions.

Full of rich culturally influenced pieces from a wide assortment of lifestyles, there is not a dull moment in sight within the galleries’ walls. Sculptures depicting differing ages and cultures, beautifully composed photographic pieces that artificially falsify the reflection of nature, even the plinths form works of art structured from recycled wood. The exhibition considers a wealth of opinions and ideals generated through the duo’s three year research period. It suggests the past as much as it does the continuum of time, the transformation of familiar museological objects questions both our interaction with the past, and our wavering value of its importance. The objects denote all that we signify as old, with new disturbing morals and values we now portray as a society. This exhibition is both an enlightening and a worrying depiction of our actions brought into direct comparison with the actions of the past. Under-layered with an awareness of nature and our natural surroundings, all of the objects urge us to more deeply analyse the world we live in and its potential as our legacy.

Ruth Page

The Impermanent Collection runs from the 8th September until the 6th October at Occupy My Time Gallery, Enclave 9 Resolution Way, Deptford, London SE8 4NT.

For more information, click here.

For more information on artist duo Maslen and Mehra click here.

 

 SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 · 9:32 AM

Maslen and Mehra Contemporise the Past: History and Politics, Nature and Culture in Exceptional Photographs and Astounding Sculpture…

Venture into Deptford this September and right opposite the station, you’ll find that a whole host of artists have moved in – two of whom are Maslen and Mehra, a collaborative duo debating contemporary issues through a diverse range of mediums.

Having gained recognition for their photographic series Mirrored – an experimental photographic series which saw armies, animals and figures from all eras silhouetted in reflective aluminium take residence in both every day, and the world’s most memorable landscapes – the pairing have continued to use medium format cameras and mirroring for this new series of work:Impermanent Collection.

The exhibition is a manifestation of several trips Maslen and Mehra have made to the world’s finest galleries, museums and archaeological collections; clearly displaying their interest in history and scientific, sociological, political and cultural issues. For me, their sculptural pieces also highlighted the importance of ancient artefacts and historical artworks to our contemporary art culture – institutes such as the British Museum or the house collections of museums such as the V&A are often rebuffed in favour of something newer, seemingly more exciting, when in fact these early examples of creativity are incredibly valuable to our understanding of art today. You wouldn’t study politics without referencing its history, so why treat the arts any differently?

Maslen and Mehra pay tribute to artistic relics ranging from Eighteenth Century Chinese Kraak plates to Christian Louboutin’s shoes: there is no primary cultural reference – instead it is more a global anthropological study illustrated through skilfully crafted sculptures and technically brilliant photography.

Although the artists still employ a combination of laser and hand-cut aluminium mirrors for their photographic work, they have now begun to paint, draw, work into these mirrors and to take printed images to the shoots as substitutes for reflections of the surrounding landscape. This allows the artists to have more control over the tone of the piece – for example this silhouetted copy of a 400-500AD Afghan Head of Buddha holds a blue haze and acquires a fitting dreamlike aura.

Still, however well-planned, the work is essentially site-specific and therefore inevitably down to chance; for example this 2D replica of La Négresse, J.B. Carpeaux, 1872 found its home entangled within the roots of a fortuitously discovered upturned tree which perfectly echo the swathes of rope which wrap the enslaved figure.

While the mirror pieces are immediately appreciated for their enchanting aesthetic, the couple’s sculptural pieces are far more subtle: ornate Victorian shoes are in fact embellished with bruises and wounds, flies cluster around the toes of a delicate Venetian Chopine and beetles crawl up the ankles of an Alexander McQueen – this display entitled Shoe Exhibit may imitate a recent V&A exhibition but its attitude towards the fashion industry, the way women lace themselves into unnatural garments and the economy of it all is far darker than the blue silks and pink velvets seen in the original assemblage.

 

These political points carry through into a series of fascinating adaptations of ceramic plates from all over the world. Upon first glance these are simply charmingly painted pieces of crockery, pieces which many people may walk straight past in museums; however what Maslen and Mehra highlight and expand upon, is that these artefacts had great meaning at their conception. Through digital printing, drawing, painting and collage, the themes of these items are contemporised so the set of eights plates now pictorially discuss global issues. When talking to Jennifer Mehra, she explained that while they could make these statements in a stronger more blatant way, they enjoy the process of the work and the idea that different viewers will discover and connect with different elements within their work – this I personally agree with, as I believe all art should have the ability to provoke a conversation, something which this series certainly does.

I won’t go through each and every plate as exploring the imagery is part of the fun of this exhibition, but two in particular stood out to me: firstly Profits and Poisons explores China’s recent economic boom and its unfortunate ecological consequences with photographs of their eight most polluted cities; and Food Futureswith its luminous golds and intense blue employs the motto ‘waste not want not’ to look at food security – food as a commodity, a political tool, rather than something to be harvested together and shared as

represented by the original ceramic which bore the same motto. These plates reveal a dense layering of imagery and meaning – some humorous, some serious – but all stunning and worth taking your time over to absorb each individual story.

 

Finally the totemic pieces which stand duty on the gallery floor: three busts adapted from museum pieces. Like Shoe Exhibit, these emulate the experience of museum viewing; however for me, they do so not only through the way they imitate museum set-up (plinths, information cards) but through their sense of the uncanny. Viewing works in museums is often uncanny as you are looking at a piece you are familiar with in reproduction, but not in reality, this is mimicked by the experience of viewing Maslen and Mehra’s sculptures:  they are what you expect to see,  altered. Instead of marble, they are paper, instead of being littered with soft cracks and imperfections they are plastered with lichen and printed with actual litter – signalling the competition between nature and culture which exists today.

 

 

Impermanent Collection is a representation of three years’ worth of work which varies dramatically in its medium, but is unified in its discussion. It is so refreshing to see contemporary art which values and understands its heritage, and by that I mean art history on a global scale as we can no longer pigeon hole work into Western, Eastern, outsider art – or within contemporary art to only highlight political issues close to home. This exhibition is certainly an all-encompassing survey of art, history, political and cultural issues but it is not confrontational in the slightest; instead through the artists’ skill it has been refined, and by their choice the work is as elusive as it is frank, and as delicate as it is powerful.

 

A small but potent collection of treasures in an exciting new venue – well worth the Oyster.

Chloe Hodge

TIME OUT Impermanent Collection. 8th September 2012 

http://www.timeout.com/london/art/event/274599/impermanent-collection


http://www.photomonitor.co.uk/2012/07/impermanent-collection/

Maslen & Mehra

Impermanent Collection

Occupy My Time Gallery / London / England

‘Archaeology is perhaps the best tool we have for looking ahead, because it provides a deep reading of the direction and momentum of our course through time: what we are, where we have come from, and therefore where we are most likely to be going.’  Excerpt from A Short History Of Progress by Ronald Wright 

The collaborative artists, MASLEN & MEHRA, will be showing work from their new series based on 3 years research in museums across the globe. Impermanent Collection comprises a series of photo-sculptures and documented temporary installations based on historical and contemporary objects found in museums. Multiple visits to the Victoria & Albert and British Museums, London; the Metropolitan Museum, New York; the Archaeological Museum, the Turkish and Islamic Art Museum, Istanbul; and the Asian Museum of Civilization in Singapore have resulted in the study and documentation of particular objects. Historical, cultural, political, technological, environmental and scientific references, alongside themes of natural history, all inform this work. References which allude to a conflicted existence on earth faced by cultures today: On one hand an appreciation for the importance of the natural world for our existence and, on the other, an unsustainable rate of consumption. These transformed museum objects offer some disturbing thoughts about the legacy of current generations. They suggest a connection between civilizations ‘progress’ and the unsustainable structures we impose to gain it. At the same time, the Impermanent Collection series imbues optimism: Imagery which celebrates diverse cultures and creativity with the hope that current and future generations will learn from the past. 

Works by MASLEN & MEHRA are included in collections such as Tattinger Switzerland, Art Es Collecion Madrid, numerous international private collections and more recently the Altered Landscape Collection, Nevada Museum of Art which includes artists such as Bernd and Hilla Becher, Lewis Baltz, Edward Burtynsky, Amy Stein, David Maisel, and Fandra Chang. Solo exhibitions have been staged in New York, London, Paris, Rome, Barcelona, Dubai, Istanbul, Sydney and Berlin. A monograph titled MIRRORED is dedicated to two major series of work, the Mirrored and Native series, and was published by Verlag für moderne Kunst Nürnberg with support from the Arts Council Of England and texts by art historian Edward Lucie-Smith and Eugen Blume, curator at the Hamburger Bahnoff Museum Berlin. In 2011, there was a solo presentation of work from these two series for the Scotiabank CONTACT International Photo Festival, Toronto and, in addition, a commissioned public installation of lightboxes was commissioned for Halifax Ferry Terminal. A solo exhibition for Art Month Sydney took place at Conny Dietzschold Gallery in March 2012. 

OCCUPY MY TIME was founded in 2006 by Sue Cohen, an artist, curator and  educator. This is the first permanent gallery space for OCCUPY MY TIME which has been  presenting  exciting and intriguing visual arts events in interesting spaces. These spaces were often outside the traditional gallery space and interacted directly with the audience through its choice of fascinating environments.





















http://chloeeleanor.wordpress.com/2012/09/13/maslen-and-mehra-contemporise-the-past-history-and-politics-nature-and-culture-in-exceptional-photographs-and-astounding-sculpture/

Maslen and Mehra Contemporise the Past: History and Politics, Nature and Culture in Exceptional Photographs and Astounding Sculpture…

Venture into Deptford this September and right opposite the station, you’ll find that a whole host of artists have moved in – two of whom are Maslen and Mehra, an Australian collaborative debating contemporary issues through a diverse range of mediums.

Having gained recognition for their photographic series Mirrored – an experimental photographic series which saw armies, animals and figures from all eras silhouetted in reflective aluminium take residence in both every day, and the world’s most memorable landscapes – the pairing have continued to use medium format cameras and mirroring for this new series of work:Impermanent Collection.

The exhibition is a manifestation of several trips Maslen and Mehra have made to the world’s finest galleries, museums and archaeological collections; clearly displaying their interest in history and scientific, sociological, political and cultural issues. For me, their sculptural pieces also highlighted the importance of ancient artefacts and historical artworks to our contemporary art culture – institutes such as the British Museum or the house collections of museums such as the V&A are often rebuffed in favour of something newer, seemingly more exciting, when in fact these early examples of creativity are incredibly valuable to our understanding of art today. You wouldn’t study politics without referencing its history, so why treat the arts any differently?

Maslen and Mehra pay tribute to artistic relics ranging from Eighteenth Century Chinese Kraak plates to Christian Louboutin’s shoes: there is no primary cultural reference – instead it is more a global anthropological study illustrated through skilfully crafted sculptures and technically brilliant photography.

Although the artists still employ a combination of laser and hand-cut aluminium mirrors for their photographic work, they have now begun to paint, draw, work into these mirrors and to take printed images to the shoots as substitutes for reflections of the surrounding landscape. This allows the artists to have more control over the tone of the piece – for example this silhouetted copy of a 400-500AD Afghan Head of Buddha holds a blue haze and acquires a fitting dreamlike aura.

Still, however well-planned, the work is essentially site-specific and therefore inevitably down to chance; for example this 2D replica of La Négresse, J.B. Carpeaux, 1872 found its home entangled within the roots of a fortuitously discovered upturned tree which perfectly echo the swathes of rope which wrap the enslaved figure.

While the mirror pieces are immediately appreciated for their enchanting aesthetic, the couple’s sculptural pieces are far more subtle: ornate Victorian shoes are in fact embellished with bruises and wounds, flies cluster around the toes of a delicate Venetian Chopine and beetles crawl up the ankles of an Alexander McQueen – this display entitled Shoe Exhibit may imitate a recent V&A exhibition but its attitude towards the fashion industry, the way women lace themselves into unnatural garments and the economy of it all is far darker than the blue silks and pink velvets seen in the original assemblage.

These political points carry through into a series of fascinating adaptations of ceramic plates from all over the world. Upon first glance these are simply charmingly painted pieces of crockery, pieces which many people may walk straight past in museums; however what Maslen and Mehra highlight and expand upon, is that these artefacts had great meaning at their conception. Through digital printing, drawing, painting and collage, the themes of these items are contemporised so the set of eights plates now pictorially discuss global issues. When talking to Jennifer Mehra, she explained that while they could make these statements in a stronger more blatant way, they enjoy the process of the work and the idea that different viewers will discover and connect with different elements within their work – this I personally agree with, as I believe all art should have the ability to provoke a conversation, something which this series certainly does.

I won’t go through each and every plate as exploring the imagery is part of the fun of this exhibition, but two in particular stood out to me: firstly Profits and Poisons explores China’s recent economic boom and its unfortunate ecological consequences with photographs of their eight most polluted cities; and Food Futureswith its luminous golds and intense blue employs the motto ‘waste not want not’ to look at food security – food as a commodity, a political tool, rather than something to be harvested together and shared as represented by the original ceramic which bore the same motto. These plates reveal a dense layering of imagery and meaning – some humorous, some serious – but all stunning and worth taking your time over to absorb each individual story.

Finally the totemic pieces which stand duty on the gallery floor: three busts adapted from museum pieces. Like Shoe Exhibit, these emulate the experience of museum viewing; however for me, they do so not only through the way they imitate museum set-up (plinths, information cards) but through their sense of the uncanny. Viewing works in museums is often uncanny as you are looking at a piece you are familiar with in reproduction, but not in reality, this is mimicked by the experience of viewing Maslen and Mehra’s sculptures:  they are what you expect to see,  altered. Instead of marble, they are paper, instead of being littered with soft cracks and imperfections they are plastered with lichen and printed with actual litter – signalling the competition between nature and culture which exists today.

Impermanent Collection is a representation of three years’ worth of work which varies dramatically in its medium, but is unified in its discussion. It is so refreshing to see contemporary art which values and understands its heritage, and by that I mean art history on a global scale as we can no longer pigeon hole work into Western, Eastern, outsider art – or within contemporary art to only highlight political issues close to home. This exhibition is certainly an all-encompassing survey of art, history, political and cultural issues but it is not confrontational in the slightest; instead through the artists’ skill it has been refined, and by their choice the work is as elusive as it is frank, and as delicate as it is powerful.

A small but potent collection of treasures in an exciting new venue – well worth the Oyster.

MASLEN & MEHRA

Impermanent Collection

8th Sept – 6th Oct 2012

Occupy My Time Gallery

                                                                                      Enclave 9 Resolution Way Deptford London SE8 4NT


http://artprweb.com/2012/08/28/impermanent-collection-london/

http://www.astonishworld.com/2012/preview-maslen-mehras-impermanent-collection/

http://www.re-title.com/artists/Maslenand-Mehra2.asp

http://blog.re-title.com/features/sculpture/page/2/


SURVIVORS GREG ROOK. OCT 2012

http://alisonmercer.wordpress.com/2012/11/16/q-and-a-with-an-artist-greg-rook-and-his-survivors-paintings/

London Art Fair
Shona Davies and Dave Monaghan
Presents
Univited 1, 11,111
for OCCUPY MY TIME GALLERY

All Your Dogs Are Dead Davies & Monaghan Collaborative Exhibition Announced

http://www.artlyst.com/articles/all-your-dogs-are-dead-davies-monaghan-collaborative-exhibition-announced


 ONE STOP ARTS

http://onestoparts.com/

The London Art Fair is now celebrating its 25th year as a major event for modern and contemporary British art. With four levels and over 100 galleries exhibiting works by their top artists, visitors can expect to be overwhelmed by the amount of work on show. An art fair's purpose is, undeniably, selling art – often painfully clear from the way gallerists seem to hide inside an invisible soundproof box whenever I, not at all resembling a rich collector, approach a booth. But there are many less commercial projects, performances and other happenings that also make the London Art Fair attractive to casual visitors.

Up on the fourth floor of the Business Design Centre, Islington are the Art Projects – a curated showcase of London's leading contemporary galleries. This is the place to start for a sample slice of the city's emerging artists and artist-led spaces – as well as works that do not traditionally make their way into art fairs. Check out some well-known contemporary names such as BEARSPACE (a Deptford pioneer since 2001), Limoncello (one of the organisers of last year's Sunday Fair), Ceri Hand and The Wapping Project Bankside. Whitechapel Gallery are also displaying a selection of artists including Gillian Wearing (My Hand), Zarina Bhimji and Alice Channer.

ALISN (Artist-Led Initiatives Support Network) have set up a fantastic project in the LAF Projects space to critically examine the art fair as a commercial fixture. Their booth, SUBLET, has literally sublet space to twelve artist-led galleries, as well as film and performance artists – and gives emerging and promising new artists (usually housed in industrial areas or neighborhoods off the beaten track) much-needed exposure. From one of these, Occupy My Time Gallery, Shona Davies and David Monaghan's Uninvited series (2012) was particularly memorable: three coloured boxes with tiny windows turn the viewer into voyeur, as you peep into a room and watch intimate and unsettling animated scenes unfold.

Julia Vogl's PREDICTING – The London Winter Weather, displayed by Hoxton Art Gallery, is a charming and simple piece: here you can tie a coloured ribbon onto strings representing each day of the fair with your prediction of the weather. I chose a bright green "Raining like a cow relieving itself" ribbon for Thursday – whether or not the weather agrees, it's a cute idea and added a touch of fun to the fair.

Patrick Hughes' disorienting relief painting was stopping visitors in their path: it is a series of corners and doors that seem to wobble and move. As you approach the piece, it resolves itself and the veil suddenly drops. The mirage-like doors, almost unbelievably, are protruding by a good six inches – a fascinating optical illusion (at the Flowers Gallery booth).

It's also worth taking a look at Photo50, the guest-curated section on contemporary 
photography – including works by Dorothy Bohm (whose Women in Focus exhibition is still on at the Museum of London).

These are just a few of the fair's many highlights, but the London Art Fair runs until Sunday, so there is plenty of time to take a wander through and see what catches your eye. Although it's often very tempting, you don't need to be in the market for a Picasso to have a browse – there are plenty of hip young visitors swanning about, whom I suspect are at least partially here for the free drinks.

Date reviewed: Wednesday 16th January 2013


Sarah Lightman The Book of Sarah

9th May-1st June 2013

Artist Sarah Lightman in Conversation with Emily Mahon : ‘The Book of Sarah: A Life in Drawings and Animated Films’ Occupy My Time blog

"And God Remembered Sarah" (comic and feature) in Art Review, Paul Gravett (May 2013)

Sarah Lightman: The Book of Sarah, Paul Gravett (May 2013) 

Sarah Lightman draws on her life experiences, London Jewish News, Francine Wolfisz (May 20 2013)

The Book of Sarah Cartoon Kippah, Liat Rosenthal (May 21 2013)

Sarah Lightman, Exhibiting Comics, Panel Borders (Resonance FM) Alex Fitch (May 2013)

Pre-production at Occupy My Time Gallery, 8th July 2013

http://www.louisebristow.com/news/


Andy Wicks The Doldrums Residency and Solo Show 9th July-29th September 2013 

Great Review of The Doldrums written by Rachel Guthrie 

http://rachelelizaguthrie.wordpress.com/2013/09/25/andy-wicks-doldrums-at-occupy-my-time-gallery/




                

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